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. at the highest levels of united states government, we are committed to helping the drc and its neighbors in this cycle of violence and instability so we do not find ourselves back -- so that we do not find ourselves in another three years with another crisis in the vrsc. the secretary clinton, ambassador riesch, undersecretary for political affairs and ambassador windy sherman high and -- and i have all met with an spoken with the rwandan and rwanda and officials in the past few weeks for a rapid and peaceful resolution to the crisis. i have travelled to the region just last month with my british and french counterparts to press the condoleezza, rwanda in, and ugandan governments to work together and start the crisis and address the causes of instability. and all three governments reiterated to us their shared goals -- their share gold -- shared goals. all three indicated to was that the most abusive commanders are now under targeted sanctions and we have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december
government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his government's visions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country's economy. japan's debt is projected to reach $12.8 trillion by next march. the ratio to the country's gross domestic product is 226%, the worst among developed nations. abe has pledged to halve the fiscal deficit by march 2016. the new government intends to finance its spending without borrowing by fiscal 2020. they hope to achieve the goal by cutting expenses. this would involve squeezing social security costs. all eyes ar
"newsline." shinzo abe is getting down to the business of governing japan for the second time. he says his new cabinet is taking all the challenges the country faces, including a sluggish economy and last year's disaster. abe explained in his news conference his cabinet is designed to overcome the crisis. he says reviving the economy is a top priority. >> translator: a strong economy is the basis of japan's power. reviving a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies and a strategy to encourage private investment toward economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> are prime minister abe says he and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is t
is heating up over whether the government should be throwing your tax dollars at industry the first place. i asked robert bryce, senior fellow at the manhattan institute about this issue. let's start with the tax credit. >> sure. gerri: this is industry, let's face it they don't have a whole lot to show for themselves yet we subsidize them to the tune of $1.2 billion. why? >> remember the industry said we're all about reducing carbon dioxide. that was the whole argument. now it shifted we create jobs argument. if congress does not extend production tax credit we'll lose 37,000 jobs. they might get an extension but there is big push among utilities, a lot of groups to end the tax credit and it very well could be ended. gerri: it doesn't work that well. 84% fail to produce electricity when the demand is great. as a solution to our energy problems how would you rate it? >> it is not a solution and it is wholly dependent on electric utilities and electric generation that can be dispatched. we can't count on wind. when demand is highest wind output is generally at its lowest. that's a big problem
-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much
. recall that in past years a couple decades ago when we became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan, we cut off militaryoff assistance to the pakistani military and that led to very negative consequences so while some of these choices are very difficult, i am inclined in that direction of greater rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there's any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: you talk about declining powers, does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report i just referred to talk about the day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but the so-called first among equals.t m they project around 2030. your thoughts and your reckoning on whether or not you agree with that, they will come if not declining of other powers. >> i certainly think since the financial crisis back in 2007, 2008, there has been a tendency to write this down, if you will, but i think many of those assessmentsit have been unduly pessimistic and even downright wrong at times. we are still the most powerful economy in the wo
basically raise money to cover eight days of government spending, but you know, david and adam, we've had the letter from nancy pelosi. do you really believe it was a ploy to smoke out the republicans? because nancy pelosi in her letter is equating millionaires to big oil, special interest and corporations. why doesn't the g.o.p. capitalize on that they really want middle class tax hikes when they're talking about raising taxes on the 250,000 plus crowd >> well, i think speaker boehner and the republicans in the house would be able to get some democrats support for the millionaire tax increase which i don't think they did enough of and they had to call off that vote as we all know on that plan. but some democrats would support something like that, but we're talking here about the leadership speaker-- minority leader pelosi and you know, she, because now it's republicans proposing it, now they seem to be backing away. they might be able to get some conservative leaning or moderate democrats to support something like that. and the president, as we know, the white house has signaled they wou
a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for t
to see less money in your paycheck. >> the government has to bite the bullet with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. more than half of that is to the defense budget. >> they say families may need austerity calculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need in the future to decide if you need the next big picture. doug? >> doug: thank you, molly. residents of the webster new york neighborhood set ablaze christmas eve have been allowed to return back to their homes. they say exconflict william spangler set the fire as a trap to lure firefighters to their death before turning the gun on himself. four were struck with bull lels, two survived and are in stable condition. >>> somber christmas day in newtown, connecticut. volunteers took three-hour shift to ensure 26 candles stayed lit at candle light vigil. it was filled with snow covered teddy bears, flowers and toys. two tv news hosts have a little explaining to do on the topic of gun control. that's later in the grapevine. up next, is the federal government shirking duty when it comes to public
the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel and providing them with adequate equipment and training. this report and this hearing are just the beginning of ou
of government, nothing was more important than the maintenance of the system. i will close here by segway to something that might give you a little more than an idea of what is specifically in this book. five differences between the original tea party and today. were five reasons they should have seen their losses coming. [laughter] you have to amuse yourself. [laughter] the original tea party was conducted on british ships as a raid by the sons of liberty, composed largely of working men, sailors, traitors, and storekeepers. today, the so-called tea party and sons of liberty represent the most conservative of the republican party. number two is the original sons of liberty orchestrated an armed rebellion against the british, so that american government could be formed. contemporary tea party and sons of liberty members enjoy the benefits of that very government. they just don't seem very happy that much of the time. number three, most of the wealth in the american colonies was held by british subjects who oppose the common when two parties of the day. every tea party's will happily tell
the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >>> as folks dig out, the flight delays delays rack up. nearly 1300 flights canceled so far. mike tobin is at chicago's o'hare with the latest. >> when you talk about the flight cancellations, the hubs of o'hare, atlanta, did not get hit so the megaripple didn't happen. the places that you see the cancel legislations are the destination. ohio, michigan, indiana, stretching all the way to the eastern seaboard. if that city is socked in, there's where the flights are canceled. it's a serious storm. you might have mentioned six people were killed, mostly people who elected to get out on the roadways. these are states like iowa, indiana, central illinois, where more than a foot of snow came on down. all of those people who made it to destinations for christmas are trying to get home. between them and home is snow, ice, and gusts up to
to government and different sets of divisions and values and everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tethered to this big idea and when i wrote to the book of course we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but i looked at how she developed the governing strategy, and they're really culminated in november, so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david korn, showdown is the most recent book and we are here at the national press club. >>> robert discusses the role that geography has played in shaping the defense and talks about the role that it plays in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they w
actually being shut down on the defense contracting side and other government services not being paid for. that i can see. much higher taxes soaking up the revenue. so yes, that is a big thing. this is all gamesmanship about going over the cliff. both sides can say they win if they go fo over the cliff, oddly enough. and that is where we are going. shibani: i wants to ask both of you, when are we going to get back to fundamentals? the bottom line for investors, when are we going to get back to fundamentals, what month, what quarter in 2013? >> i think it will be in a couple of weeks here in january. it is earnings season, we will get a picture into what companies are seeing. it is almost irrelevant what happened in the fourth quarter. we want to pay attention to what they're seeing from their customers looking into the future. shibani: what are you looking for in 2013? >> i think we will get there when we figure out this cliff situation and the other half when the fed lays off the pedal because that is the other real peace driving us, driving the market beyond the market fundamentals. dav
difficult for the federal government. people are wary of all of the uncertainty. they are keeping their pocketbooks closed during this all-important spending season. do you see that as an interesting perspective? >> i think at this point, here you have this santa claus rally which is a market phenomenon that makes sense until it doesn't. that works until it doesn't. coming into this season we would have a typical 1.7% increase in the s&p 500. now, we are dealing with questions that will remain unanswered until january. that uncertainty makes investors anxious. tracy: we have for trading days left. what should we be doing? what should people be doing over the course of the next couple trading days? >> i think people should really look at their capital gains. we are at a point now where capital gains is going up. it makes sense to take him and reposition them when we find out what will happen. lori: i have to tell you, i think stocks are the place to be. stocks, even emerging market stocks, there is a lot of strategy. how would you recommend it? >> i think equity because bond yields
who may remember that there were a couple of sections in the government code that require every school district in california, every year to provide the following information on what is called "developer impact fees," which are essentially the fees that a school district collects from developers that build within our cities and our counties, depending on whether it's a commercial or residential project and to report every year how much money we collected and how much interest we earned and what we spent the money with and to make sure that money was spent appropriately. and so also provide a certain projection of five years down the road, what we intend to spend the money on? and that is a requirement of the government code and so every year we hire a consultant to do an outside audit of our fees and provide the report. and so the requested action, i would ask of the board tonight is that the board of education of the san francisco unified school district review and adopt the developer impact fee annual and five-year reports for the fiscal year ending june 30, 2012. the attached repo
protest today against the shi-ite-dominated government, the third in less than a week. protesters filled the streets in ramadi in anbar province chanting "topple the regime." the demonstrations began after police arrested ten bodyguards assigned to the sunni finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are wi
for a tax increase in 22 years. that has really slowed down the growth of government from what it would've been otherwise. now, obama comes in and wants to spend more and raise taxes. republicans are saying no. we would have a problem if obama hadn't increased the budget by a trillion dollars more a year. gerri: let's face it, whether you're talking about stimulus spending, obamacare, that's3 going to go through the roof, the things that you're going to pay for all this with higher taxes is lunacy, to say the least. on that note, we're going to have to leave it there. thank you for coming, grover. we hope to see you in the new year. christmas sales were weaker than expected. so now retailers have to give shoppers deeper discounts. in a new proposal to help struggling homeowners. don't worry, the government will take care of you. we will explain coming up next ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years
government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what we're forecast to spend. we really can't save less than 2%? of course we can. i think we've as a country, both sides talk about the big headline number and they don't put it in perspective. how much are we talking about in terms of revenue. as a share of the revenue we're going to raise over the next ten years. how much are we talking about saving in these accounts in relationship to how much we're going to spend? i think th
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
an actual all-time high again. anyway, among the catalysts, a new pro-business government preparing to assume leadership, incoming prime minister shinzo abe. what is it, 50,000 that it has to get to? >> 39,000 i believe is the peak. >> who's counting, right? that's a ways off. >> yeah. far away. >> shinzo abe has been putting pressure on the bank of japan to raise its inflation target in hopes of extricating the country from two decades of deflation. i guess if you just raised the target -- >> that would help. >> okay. >> it doesn't matter what your target is if you can't hit it. >> we found that out here. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to fi
hard-earned profit. not giving them to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. instead they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative elliso, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. melissa: but you say hard-earned dollars. congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give the money they have is my money taken from me. it is companies money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. exxon is hanging on to earnings, rather these are deductions rather than sending even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money that is exxon's money hanging on to but they'r not taking money back. they're hanging onto the mon
the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i've noticed from what i've read that there are millions of people in china who make just a few dollars a day. and they are on the own land and they're not very rich really. and you have quite a lot of money i gather. i was told. and suppose they also look, we are in the majority, and justice money down you. we're going to take it all away from you and give it to us. and the one who started this, i said to you favor that? if that's the result. he said i am in favor of democracy, but maybe not right now. [laughter] so you see, it's like a tiger by the tail. so you start looking at the other side, and they are afraid of a certain kind of chaos or of a certain kind of, and so somehow you have to, you have to, now that, that is partly, that
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
both on the government side, the reform side, as well as currencies. so i think there's definitely a handful of risks. and you have to kind of -- the play for emerging markets is change. i think when you used to invest as efts, you have to look at the markets differently. i think you have to be more careful. >> all right. let's focus on india. i know you just got back from a long trip where you were evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions graduall
think about politics, how we think about government, how we think about each other. >> there is a cultural shift, and jon meacham, i thought it was very telling what newt gingrich said about the republican party's challenges. he said they either wake up to the realities that are facing them. this election was much worse for them than they expected, or there will be young voters who will be obama democrats for the next 40 years. this could be a watershed election if the republicans don't respond in the correct way. >> one of the interesting things -- and i wonder if rick in thinking all this out, if what you all made of this -- is, you know, fdr had this legacy. you still had people -- hubert humphrey was still running in 1 1968 as an fdr democrat. one question i have is, is this wave of democrats, and is obama himself a sui generous figure or is he a kiclintonian figure? >> i addressed some of this. the "r" word, realignment, is something that people are talking about. there was a reagan realignment, and basically you could argue that this is finally the end of the
regulations) to clarify that government entities operating parking garages or parking lots are exempt from the permitting requirements applicable to other commercial parking garage and valet operations. >> thank you very much. i believe we have a representative from supervisor campos' office here. >> good morning, supervisors. [speaker not understood] on behalf of supervisor david campos. the legislation before you amends the city's parking enforcement laws under the business and tax code. it reduces the bonding requirement for operators that have a strong record of tax compliance and simplifies the bonding categories. additionally, the legislation includes other clarifications and administrative changes that ms. florence mar who manages the business tax section of the treasurer and tax collector's office will present on. supervisor campos introduced this legislation after hearing from small parking operators that were having a difficult time meeting the high bonding requirements and larger operators that have operated in good faith with a proven record of responsible third-party tax colle
substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city go
and local government. when i think about the hate crimes cases and the other cases i've done, i've made friends for life with local law enforcement officers, with local da's and local community leaders who have been our eyes and ears. when i look around this audience i really appreciate the fact you have all the ingredients of reform and improvement. i have had the privilege of serving in the federal government, as melinda described, i've had the privilege of serving in state government as a state cabinet official back in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope
about 77%. and president morsi, the government may soon have to take some unpopular measures to try and prop up the economy here, which could hurt them at the ballot box. >> let's pick up on the reports of the economy. there have been reports of people taking savings out of banks. is there fear there could be capital flight out of egypt and possibly even the liberal people who are not happy with this constitution, uping stakes, leaving the country and ep grating. >> there are all sorts of fears, and there are some people who will be frightened about that. other members of the opposition say they will continue to fight against this constitution, and they will try and do it through parliament. they will try and do it through the election campaign. what president morsi and his supporters are saying is this constitution isn't necessarily set in stone. they have suggested there may be the possibility of amendment. depending on who you speak to will depend on who believes that. what they are saying, the muslim brotherhood and president morsi, is that these are the first steps in egypt's n
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
, which is approvable and in compliance with the california government code provisions our policy is more stringent and that and it would take a waiver of our board policy for her to be totally on this position. that is what this is for. >> so is the recommendation to do a waiver then? >> yes. the recommendation is a waiver. >> the waiver is actually imbedded in this. >> okay good. thank you. any other commissioner comments? >> yes, i have a question for our attorney. i see that this is for the oaks children center and that is the place of employment of commissioner maufas, is that correct? >> yes, ma'am. >> so that would seem that commissioner maufas would be not able to vote on any thing pertaining to the oaks children center. is that correct? >> that is correct. >> does that extend to not be able to vote -- since oak's children center is a non-public school placement, would that mean she would not be able to vote on any non-public school placement resolutions or any contracts? >> my advice to commissioner maufas is that she not vote on any non-public school matter. >> so
the the boat house and its equipment. we will head in a much better direction. and please sfpuc govern as much as this as you can. >> dr. jackson. >> thank you very much, dr. jackson is here. i agree, that need to be a workshop. what happens in san francisco, people come here late and don't know the neighborhoods. and what is been going on in the neighborhoods. and it's the neighbors that can tell you. and i support the idea that you, since you were responsible for water and sewage, that you take charge. that is your responsibility. the water sheds is your responsibilities. so i am here supporting the residents from lake merced, because the lake is the most -- was at one time the most beautiful lake in any city. because i used to go over there and fish, i am a fishing woman. and i would like to continue. and i agree about although i do own a gun. but i don't believe that there should be a place out there where there is a park, where people are shooting bullets. bullets can go anywhere, because it don't have no name on it, in the direction it should go. i feel as though when i go and practice f
and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the weekly standard" and one of most handsome and well-regarded editors in the country as everybody knows. look, i think he was making what was, in effect a practical case. there are people who are making this case behind the scenes. you have seen, he said, get it over with. move beyond this. there are others saying absolutely not. republicans can't cave on the principle of raising tacks. i think interesting thing in wh
for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secret
pensions and working hard on economic development and job retention. he is making city government more responsive and efficient and making public safety a top priority. mayor lee is a long time public servant. prior to becoming mayor, he served as city administrator where he focused on government efficiency and measures and reforms that reduced the size and cost of government. mayor lee first began working for the city and county of san francisco in 1989 as the investigator for the city's first whistle blower program. prior to employment with the city and county of san francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he
observation on the unchanging nature of governance comes in its screen play based in part on the book "team of rivals." recently, the script received the new york film critics circle award, one of what will doubtless be many honors. tony first came to most people's attention with the epic play "angels in america," a devastating account of the a.i.d.s. epidemic while it was at its worst. tony received both a tony award and the pulitzer prize for drama as well as a primetime emmy award for its television adaptation on hbo. that was some 20 years ago. in the years since, tony's reputation as one of our most accomplished and sometimes controversial modern play writes has only grown. welcome. >> thank you. >> you said you worked six years. how did you go about the research? >> i just started reading. we started with doris' book. i was curious to read it. it's a great read and a great book, but it's the definition of a thing that can turn into a 2 1/2 hour script. i knew immediately from what i had read there was going to be too much material if we tried to cover the whole thing and the civil war
. >>> kurdistan is suspending all of its oil exports. its regional government says iraq's central government has underpaid its share of export revenue. the export halt affects about 100 thousand barrels of crude every day. >>> terrorist cell arrests and shiftdown hurt oil futures as they hit a two-month high. crude settled up more than 2 1/2%, closing at $90.98 a barrel. we'll turn our attention attention to something less economic oriented but something certainly important. that's syria. one of syria's top generals defected alleging chemical weapons are being used by the assad regime against rebels. has the u.s.'s red line for intervention been crossed? details coming up on that. >>> thousand of union dock workers could bring ports across the gulf coast and eastern seaboard to a standstill starting this weekend. details how that could shipwreck businesses across the united states coming up. do you ever have too much money? i think not. ♪ people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days la
staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has been overseeing the classification of these recordings and who knows more about these 265 hours of president can '80s taped conversation than any other american. so i ask that you please join us in thanking and acknowledging his work here at the kennedy library. [applause] we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us for tonight's discussion as historian ted winters, who so carefully selected the most compelling of his remarkable recordings and wrote detailed annotations of the transcripts. with us also is owen fitzpatrick, a professor of history at the university of new hampshire, also a wonderful and frequent contributor kennedy form. my colleague and friend, tom putnam, who brings such energy to library's mission of preserving our nation's history. and our good friend we always love having with us, john. the president used a dictaphone to record his personal observations following key meetings and events. we though
in entertainment and gaming are possible in health care, education and all government services. >> if we can dig down into education a bit more because i think the disparity in our education system, the haves and have nots in terms of education is another major barrier in terms of keeping the american dream alive. our education system has basically worked the same from inception. the classroom that my daughter will be in looks like the one i was in. looks like the one my parents were in. it seems like that we may may be on the verge of a technological revolution. some example i will give you is these massive open online courses where high level institutions like harvard and mit are opening up courses to thousands of people around the world, typically free and typically no credit given. students are grading each other because there so many you could never hope to have a professor grade all the students's work. what sort of innovations do you see transforming the classroom in the way that education is delivered? >> the main thing about the internet-driven revolution and every sector of the economy
a major blow to the government of syria. the general of military police appeared on television last night and announced he was defecting and joining the rebels. while dozens of generals have left since the crisis started in march of last year he is one of the highest ranking officers to abandon the government. senate taliban is claiming responsibility for a suicide bombing outside a united states base in afghanistan. officials say a car bomb went off at the gates of camp chapman. it killed a security guard and two drivers. it injured six civilians. the base has been targeted by attacks in the past. >>> egypt has a new constitution. the president signed it into law. more than ten million voted to support it but more than two thirds did not participate. critics say it passed to quickly. human rights watch said it protects some rights but undermines others. >> russia's president could soon decide if americans should be ban from adopting russian children. the government voted in favor of such a ban. russian activists say it deprives children of the chance to leave orphanages. it's a response
for the worse we get a large macro number that hurts our market, one of those government numbers, or we get some weakness out of europe i can lose less than the people just playing the earnings momentum game because i own the best and i am short the rest. sector analysis is particularly important in technology. because people confuse this gigantic group of stocks, which comprises more than 15% of the s&p 500, constantly. tech is actually the agglomeration of a whole group of sectors, semiconductors, disc drives, software, cloud, internet, personal computers, large scale enterprise hardware makers, tech, tech communications, infrastructure stock, assemblers. each has a separate growth rate. and here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rates of the companies i follow versus the individual slices of the sectors. because the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example-r highly valued. meaning the price teernings and growth rates are extreme. that means there's no room for error, or hair as we call it, meaning something is wrong, som
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